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Rollman JE, Heyward J, Olson L, et al. JAMA. 2019;321:676-685.
Researchers assessed the effectiveness of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy in preventing inappropriate prescribing of transmucosal immediate-release fentanyl, high-risk opioid products with narrow prescribing indications. Survey data obtained from patients, providers, and pharmacists at various points after the FDA program's initiation suggested ongoing misunderstanding regarding appropriate prescribing. Analysis of claims data 5 years into the program revealed that anywhere from 35% to 55% of patients were prescribed transmucosal immediate-release fentanyl products inappropriately.
Carayon P, Wooldridge A, Hose B-Z, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2018;37:1862-1869.
System and process weaknesses can hinder safe patient care. This commentary raises awareness of human factors engineering as a key opportunity for enhancing patient safety. The authors provide recommendations to drive adoption and spread of human factors strategies through targeted education, clinician–engineer partnerships, and coordinated improvement efforts.
Vento S, Cainelli F, Vallone A. World J Clin Cases. 2018;6:406-409.
Malpractice concerns can influence treatment decisions as clinicians seek to avoid errors of omission. This commentary reviews factors that contribute to defensive medicine, underscores the role the blame culture has in perpetuating this behavior, and discusses the costs to patients, physicians, and health systems.
Lam MB, Figueroa JF, Feyman Y, et al. BMJ. 2018;363:k4011.
Accreditation is a widely accepted strategy for ensuring hospital quality and safety. Hospitals accredited by The Joint Commission have been found to have improved performance on care quality metrics. However, few researchers have investigated whether or how accreditation affects patient outcomes. Investigators used Medicare data to assess the relationship between Joint Commission accreditation, other independent accreditation, or state survey review only (no independent accreditation) on patient outcomes and experience. Surgical mortality and readmissions did not differ between hospitals with and without accreditation. For medical conditions, accredited hospitals had a lower readmission rate but no statistically significant difference in mortality rate. Patient experience was modestly better at hospitals without accreditation. These findings may reflect how state survey and independent accreditation have converged in terms of methods and efficacy. A PSNet interview with The Joint Commission's CEO discussed the organization's efforts to use accreditation as one of many tools to promote high reliability in health care.
Bates DW, Landman A, Levine DM. JAMA. 2018;320:1975-1976.
Mobile health care applications are increasingly being developed and marketed to patients for self-care and diagnosis, with little oversight as to their effectiveness or safety. This commentary outlines four key issues that must be addressed to improve the safety of medical applications.
Stucke RS, Kelly JL, Mathis KA, et al. JAMA Surg. 2018;153:1105-1110.
Many states are implementing prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) in an attempt to curb the ongoing opioid epidemic. This single-center study examined the effect of a New Hampshire policy that mandates clinicians use a PDMP and an opioid risk assessment tool prior to prescribing opioids. No impact was found on overall opioid prescribing rates. However, a recent state-level analysis found that states who implemented a PDMP had lower opioid prescribing rates compared to states without PDMPs. A PSNet perspective discussed the factors that contributed to the opioid epidemic and proposed solutions.