Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
1 - 8 of 8

Farnborough, UK: Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch; June 2022.

Handoffs between prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) providers and hospital emergency departments (EDs) can be suboptimal, which increases patient harm potential. This interim report examines National Health Service discharge delays. It suggests a systemic approach is needed to address flow and capacity factors that contribute to ineffective and unsafe interfacility discharge and transfer.
Arditi L. Peoples Public Radio. December 3, 2019.
Emergency medical services are often provided under chaotic circumstances that may contribute to failure. This story highlights a series of esophageal intubation errors and efforts to minimize this “never event” across the state of Rhode Island. Improvement strategies discussed include practice restrictions for EMT personnel and use of less invasive, less risky processes to provide oxygen as an alternative to intubation, which may reduce esophageal intubation errors
Barishansky RM, Glick DE. EMS magazine. 2009;38:43-7.
This article explains the elements of preparing policies and procedures for reportable incidents in emergency medical services.
Interrupted during a telephone handoff, an ED physician, despite limited information, must treat a patient in respiratory arrest. The patient is stabilized and transferred to the ICU with a presumed diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia and septic shock. Later, ICU physicians obtain further history that leads to the correct diagnosis: pulmonary embolism.
An elderly man, recently discharged from one hospital after having his automated internal cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) replaced, is taken to another hospital when his AICD misfires multiple times.
Wang HE, Fairbanks RJ, Shah MN, et al. Ann Emerg Med. 2008;52:256-62.
This study of closed malpractice claims against prehospital emergency medical services found that clinical management was an infrequent source of malpractice allegations, trailing emergency vehicle accidents and patient handling mishaps.