Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
1 - 8 of 8

This WebM&M highlights two cases where home diabetes medications were not reviewed during medication reconciliation and the preventable harm that could have occurred. The commentary discusses the importance of medication reconciliation, how to compile the ‘best possible medication history’, and how pharmacy staff roles and responsibilities can reduce medication errors.

Errors in medication management and administration are major threats to patient safety. This piece explores issues with opioid and nursing-sensitive medication safety as well as medication safety in older adults. Future research directions in medication safety are also discussed.

A 78-year-old woman with macular degeneration presented for a pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) with an eye block. At this particular hospital, eye cases under MAC are typically performed with an eye block by the surgeon after the anesthesiologist has administered some short-acting sedation, commonly with remifentanil. On this day, there was a shortage of premixed remifentanil and the resident – who was unfamiliar with the process of drug dilution – incorrectly diluted the remifentanil solution.

A 44-year old man with hypertension and diabetes was admitted with an open wound on the ball of his right foot that could be probed to the bone and evidence of diabetic ketoacidosis. Over the course of the hospitalization, he had ongoing hypokalemia, low magnesium levels, an electrocardiogram showing a prolonged QT interval, ultimately leading to cardiac arrest due to torsades de pointes (an unusual form of ventricular tachycardia that can be fatal if left untreated). The commentary discusses the use of protocol-based management of chronic medical conditions, the inclusion of interprofessio

ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Acute care edition. July 30, 2020;25(15).

This article reports on the results of a survey on the use of practices to improve the safety of prescribing and dispensing of long-acting opioids and use of the override feature in automated dispensing cabinets. The approximately 250 hospitals responding shared experience indicating weakness in implementing improvement efforts on the two practices studied. The results found that hospitals employing a medication safety officer had stronger uptake of the best practices.
ISMP Medication Safety Alert! Acute Care Edition. 2020;25.
Successful development of a just culture centers on understanding different types of flawed human behavior and designing effective organizational responses to these failures. This article compares human error, at-risk behavior, and reckless behavior to suggest systems design changes for patient safety programs to generate opportunities for improvement.  
Kennedy AR, Massey LR. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2019;76:1481-1491.
This Special Feature discusses risks and vulnerabilities around medications in non-pediatric hospitals that provide care to pediatric patients. The authors identify risks and provide recommendations to ensure safe care of children including optimizing technology, utilizing external resources, and ensuring a pediatric pharmacist is in place.
Parker H, Farrell O, Bethune R, et al. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2019;85:2405-2413.
Despite process changes and availability of new technologies, prescribing errors (one type of medication administration errors) remain a serious safety problem. This article describes a single-site pharmacist-led intervention that involved doctors-in-training (residents) reviewing video footage of their patient visits with a pharmacist. The feedback intervention resulted in a significant reduction in prescribing errors and was found acceptable and feasible by participants.