Skip to main content

All Content

Search Tips
Save
Selection
Format
Download
Published Date
Original Publication Date
Original Publication Date
PSNet Publication Date
Narrow Results By
PSNet Original Content
1 - 9 of 9

Simmons D, ed. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2010;22:161-290. 

Articles in this special issue discuss safe practices, effective staffing, teamwork, and event analysis to enhance patient safety in the critical care setting.

Baker GR, ed. Healthc Q. 2009;12(Spec No Patient):1-198.  

This special issue discusses Canadian patient safety efforts in identifying risks, designing safe systems, implementing solutions, developing learning systems, and understanding legal decision making.
Snijders C, van Lingen RA, Klip H, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2009;94:F210-5.
Incident reporting systems are one mechanism for hospitals to both identify and potentially prevent adverse events, although they have frequently failed to meet those expectations. This study describes findings from a voluntary system that produced a significant increase in reported neonatal events, many of which were associated with patient morbidity.
Levtzion-Korach O, Alcalai H, Orav EJ, et al. J Patient Saf. 2009;52:9-15.
The limitations of standard incident reporting systems have been well documented. Although ubiquitous and relatively easy to use, such systems detect only a fraction of adverse events, are underused by physicians, and yield data that often are not analyzed or disseminated promptly. This analysis of data from a commercial, web-based system at an academic hospital confirms some prior concerns, but the authors were able to demonstrate that rapid review of reports resulted in specific system changes to improve workflow and safety. A prior article presented a framework for using incident reporting data to improve patient safety.
Anderson HJ. Health Data Manag. 2009;17:18-20, 22, 24 passim.
Although shifting from paper-based or verbal orders to computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems could reduce medical errors, a mere 8% of hospitals use the system and fewer implement it effectively, according to the Leapfrog Group CPOE evaluation tool.