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Weenink J-W, Wallenburg I, Hartman L, et al. BMJ Open. 2022;12:e061321.
There is a long-standing tension between health care regulation and just culture principles. This qualitative study explored the experiences of mental health professionals, managers and other healthcare organization staff, as well as inspectors, regarding the role of healthcare inspectors in enabling a just culture. Three themes emerged – (1) the role of the inspector as both a catalyst for learning and a potential barrier, (2) just culture involves relationships between different layers within and outside the organization, and (3) to enable just culture in which inspectors would strike a balance between organizational responsibility and timely regulatory intervention.
Harrison R, Johnson J, McMullan RD, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;Epub May 25.
Providers who are involved in a medial error may experience a range of negative emotions and utilize a variety of coping mechanisms following the error. The authors update their 2010 systematic review on medical professionals’ coping with medical error and apply their Recovery from Situations of Error Theory (ReSET) model. The ReSET model provides a basis to develop and evaluate interventions to reduce feelings of distress and increase providers’ coping skills.
Montgomery A, Lainidi O, Johnson J, et al. Health Care Manage Rev. 2022;Epub Jun 16.
When faced with a patient safety concern, staff need to decide whether to speak up or remain silent. Leaders play a crucial role in addressing contextual factors behind employees’ decisions to remain silent. This article offers support for leaders to create a culture of psychological safety and encourage speaking up behaviors.
Maher V, Cwiek M. Hosp Top. 2022;Epub Jul 20.
Fear of criminal liability may inhibit clinicians from reporting medical errors, thereby reducing opportunities for learning. This commentary discusses recent legal actions brought against clinicians, including Tennessee nurse RaDonda Vaught, and the negative impact such actions may have on the longstanding disclosure movement.
Mrayyan MT. BMJ Open Qual. 2022;11:e001889.
Strong patient safety culture is a cornerstone to sustained safety improvements. This cross-sectional study explored nurses’ perceptions about patient safety culture. Identified areas of strength included non-punitive responses to errors and teamwork, and areas for improvement focused on supervisor and manager expectations, responses, and actions to promote safety and open communication. The authors highlight the importance of measuring patient safety culture in order to improve hospitals’ patient safety improvement practices, overall performance and quality of healthcare delivery.
Walther F, Schick C, Schwappach DLB, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;Epub May 4.
Historically, there have been many patient safety errors associated with healthcare workers’ failure to speak up and report when they notice a problem. Many studies have identified organizational culture as important in creating a safe environment for workers to report medical errors. This study reports on a multimodal program to educate and train healthcare workers resulting in improvements on speaking up behaviors.

Neft MW, Sekula K, Zoucha R, et al. AANA J. 2022;90(3):189-196. 

Healthcare workers who are involved in a patient safety incident may experience adverse psychological outcomes. This integrative review summarizes the importance of organizational safety culture and highlights strategies and programs (such as the RISE support program and peer support teams) for supporting healthcare professionals after involvement in a patient safety incident.
Farrell TW, Butler JM, Towsley GL, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:5975.
A robust culture of safety encourages open communication between team members. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and nurses in nursing homes were asked about the extent to which their input about residents was valued by the other team members. CNAs reported they felt valued by other CNAs and nurses, but less valued by physicians and pharmacists.
Loerbroks A, Vu-Eickmann P, Dreher A, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:6690.
Work engagement may be a beneficial counterpart to burnout among health care workers. This cross-sectional study explored the association between work engagement scores with self-reported concerns about having made medical errors among medical assistants in Germany.
Barnes T, Fontaine T, Bautista C, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e704-e713.
Patient safety event taxonomies provide a standardized framework for data classification and analysis. This taxonomy for inpatient psychiatric care was developed from existing literature, national standards, and content experts to align with the common formats used by the institution’s event reporting system. Four domains (provision of care, patient actions, environment/equipment, and safety culture) were identified, along with categories, subcategories, and subcategory details.
Hoff JJ, Zimmerman A, Tupetz A, et al. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2022;Epub May 6.
Involvement in serious adverse events can cause clinicians to feel significant and ongoing emotional trauma. Interviews with eight emergency medical service (EMS) personnel revealed self-perceived errors were more likely to result in feelings of shame, and a positive safety culture supported recovery and resilience.
Niederhauser A, Schwappach DLB. Health Sci Rep. 2022;5:e631.
Ensuring that healthcare staff feel comfortable speaking up about safety concerns is an important component of safety culture. This cross-sectional study explored speaking up behaviors and perceptions among healthcare workers in rehabilitation clinics in Switzerland. Barriers to speaking up included expectations of a lack of productive response to the safety concern, presence of patients, and concerns about reactions from involved individuals.
Oyegoke S, Gigli KH. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e753-e759.
Strong safety culture is a crucial pillar of patient safety improvement efforts. Based on data from the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture, this study found that staff in pediatric primary care settings had generally positive perceptions about safety culture. Researchers identified differences in perceptions based on staff role, such as between administration/management staff and direct care staff.
Isaksson S, Schwarz A, Rusner M, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:325-330.
Organizations may employ one or more methods for identifying and examining near misses and preventable adverse events, including structured record review, web-based incident reporting systems, and daily safety briefings. Using each of the three methods, this study identified the number and types of near misses and adverse events. Results indicate that each method identifies different numbers and types of adverse events, suggesting a multi-focal approach to adverse event data collection may more effectively inform organizations. 
Falcone ML, Van Stee SK, Tokac U, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e727-e740.
Adverse event reporting is foundational to improving patient safety, but many events go unreported. This review identified four key priorities in increasing adverse event reporting: understanding and reducing barriers; improving perceptions of adverse event reporting within healthcare hierarchies; improving organizational culture; and improving outcomes measurement.
Zebrak K, Yount N, Sorra J, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:6815.
AHRQ’s Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (SOPS) is used by hundreds of hospitals in the US to assess hospital patient safety culture. This study describes the development and testing of a “workplace safety supplement,” intended to be used in conjunction with the SOPS to assess how organizational culture supports workplace safety. Included survey items measured perceptions around protection from workplace hazards; moving, transferring, or lifting patients; workplace aggression; management and leadership support for workplace safety; and workplace safety reporting.
Khan A, Parente V, Baird JD, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2022;176:776-786.
Parent or caregiver limited English proficiency (LPE) has been associated with increased risk of their children experiencing adverse events. In this study, limited English proficiency was associated with lower odds of speaking up or asking questions when something does not appear right with their child’s care. Recommendations for improving communication with limited English proficiency patients and families are presented.
Giardina TD, Shahid U, Mushtaq U, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2022;Epub Jun 1.
Achieving diagnostic safety requires multidisciplinary approaches. Based on interviews with safety leaders across the United States, this article discusses how different organizations approach diagnostic safety. Respondents discuss barriers to implementing diagnostic safety activities as well as strategies to overcome barriers, highlighting the role of patient engagement and dedicated diagnostic safety champions.
Barnard C, Chung JW, Flaherty V, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;Epub Apr 28.
Organizations such as The Joint Commission and the Leapfrog Group require participating healthcare organizations to evaluate their patient safety culture, but surveys can represent a time burden on staff. An Illinois health system aimed to lessen this burden on staff by creating a shorter, revised survey. The final survey consisted of five questions with comparable measurement properties of the original 17-question survey; however, the authors caution the shorter survey will yield less detail than the longer version.
Rotteau L, Goldman J, Shojania KG, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2022;Epub Jun 1.
Achieving high reliability is a goal for every healthcare organization. Based on interviews with hospital leadership, clinicians, and staff, this study explored how healthcare professionals understand and perceive high-reliability principles. Findings indicate that some principles are more supported than others and identified inconsistent understanding of principles across different types of healthcare professionals.