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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 2374 Results
Farrell TW, Hung WW, Unroe KT, et al. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2022;Epub Oct 19.
Research into the impact of racism on health outcomes has increased in recent years, but there has been less emphasis on ageism or the intersection of ageism and racism. This commentary highlights the ways racism (e.g., clinical algorithms), ageism (e.g., proposed measures to ration care) and the intersection of the two (increased morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 on older people of color) impacts health outcomes. Recommendations for current clinicians and health profession educators are provided.
Newman B, Joseph K, McDonald FEJ, et al. Health Expect. 2022;Epub Oct 28.
Patient engagement focuses on involving patients in detecting adverse events, empowering patients to speak up, and emphasizing the patient’s role in a culture of safety. Young people ages 16-25 with experiences in cancer care, and staff who support young people with cancer were asked about their experiences with three types of patient engagement strategies. Four themes for engaging young people emerged, including empowerment, transparency, participatory culture, and flexibility. Across all these was a fifth theme of transition from youth to adult care.  
M. Violato E. Can J Respir Ther. 2022;58:137-142.
Healthcare trainees and junior clinicians are often reluctant to speak up about safety concerns. This qualitative study found that simulation training to enhance speaking up behaviors had lasting effects among advanced care paramedics and respiratory therapists as they moved from training into practice. Respondents highlighted the importance of experience for speaking up and the benefits of high-impact simulation training.
Pun BT, Jun J, Tan A, et al. Am J Crit Care. 2022;31:443-451.
Team collaboration is an essential part of ensuring patient safety in acute care settings. This survey of care team members (including nurses, physicians, pharmacists, respiratory therapists, and rehabilitation therapists) assessed teamwork and collaboration across 68 intensive care units (ICUs). Teamwork and work environment were rated favorably but care coordination and meaningful recognition were rated least favorably.
Tubic B, Finizia C, Zainal Kamil A, et al. Nurs Open. 2022;Epub Oct 31.
Interventions to increase patient engagement in safety are receiving increasing attention. In this study, patients were given a safety leaflet containing information about the patient can avoid adverse events during their hospital stay. Participants were overall satisfied about receiving information about their care but noted a lack of communication between healthcare personnel and patients regarding the safety leaflet.
Silva B, Ožvačić Adžić Z, Vanden Bussche P, et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2022;19:10515.
The COVID-19 pandemic led to dramatic changes in healthcare delivery. The multi-country PRICOV-19 study evaluated how primary care practices reorganized their day-to-day work during the pandemic and the impacts on patient safety culture. This study compared training vs. non-training primary care practices and found that training practices had a stronger safety culture during the pandemic.
Sephien A, Reljic T, Jordan J, et al. Med Educ. 2022;Epub Oct 1.
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) includes work hour restrictions in its Common Program Requirements. The focus of this review is the impact of resident work hour restrictions on patient- and resident-level outcomes. Shorter shift hours were associated with some improved resident outcomes and but no association with patient outcomes.
Lentz CM, De Lind Van Wijngaarden RAF, Willeboordse F, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2022;34:mzac078.
Effective teamwork training for surgical teams can improve post-operative mortality rates. This review aimed to evaluate the effect of a dedicated surgical team (e.g., a team who received technical and/or communication teamwork training) on clinical and performance outcomes. Implementation of dedicated surgical teams resulted in improved mortality rates, but no difference in readmission rates or length of stay.
McCain N, Ferguson T, Barry Hultquist T, et al. J Nurs Care Qual. 2023;38:26-32.
Daily huddles can improve team communication and awareness of safety incidents. This single-site study found that implementation of daily interdisciplinary huddles increased reporting of near-miss events and improved team satisfaction and perceived team communication, collaboration, and psychological safety.
Andraska EA, Phillips AR, Asaadi S, et al. J Surg Educ. 2022;Epub Oct 4.
Patients and clinicians may hold implicit gender biases and rate women clinicians more negatively. In this study, adverse event reports written about residents were reviewed to determine if resident gender was associated with different types and frequency of incident reports. The most comment complaint about men physicians involved a medical error, while the most common complaint type about women included a communication-related event. Additionally, women were more frequently identified by name only, without a title such as “doctor”.
Lauffenburger JC, Coll MD, Kim E, et al. Med Educ. 2022;56:1032-1041.
Medication errors can be common among medical trainees. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews, this study identified factors influencing suboptimal prescribing by medical residents during overnight coverage, including time pressures, perceived pressure and fear of judgement, clinical acuity, and communication issues between care team members.
Horvath D, Keith N, Klamar A, et al. J Bus Psychol. 2022;Epub Jul 26.
Error management, as opposed to error avoidance, has been shown to improve transfer of skills from training to practice. This study compared two interventions to induce error management (direct or indirect encouragement to learn from errors) and error avoidance. As hypothesized, participants in the error management groups performed better, particularly those in the indirect error management intervention.
McGurgan PM, Calvert KL, Nathan EA, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e1124-e1134.
This survey compared factors influencing opinions about patient-safety-related behaviors among medical students and physicians compared to the general public in Australia. Respondents had significantly different opinions on several of the hypothetical patient safety scenarios used in the survey. Findings suggest that physician and medical student opinions are often influenced by cognitive dissonance, biases, and heuristics.
Wong J, Lee S-Y, Sarkar U, et al. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2022;79:2230-2243.
Medication errors in ambulatory care settings represent an ongoing patient safety challenge. This study characterizes ambulatory care adverse drug events reported to a large patient safety organization between May 2012 and October 2018. Anticoagulants, antibiotics, hypoglycemics, and opioids were the most commonly involved medication classes. Contributing factors included prescribing errors, failure to review clinical contraindications or drug-drug interactions, and lack of patient education or communication.
Lagu T, Haywood C, Reimold KE, et al. Health Aff (Millwood). 2022;41:1387-1395.
People with disabilities face barriers to safe, equitable care such as inaccessible equipment and facilities or provider bias. In this study, primary care and specialist physicians described challenges with caring for patients with disabilities. Many expressed explicit biases such as reluctance to care for people with disabilities, invest in accessible equipment, or obtain continuing education to provide appropriate care.
Wu G, Podlinski L, Wang C, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2022;48:665-673.
Simulation training is used to improve technical and nontechnical skills among healthcare teams. This study evaluated the impact of a one-hour interdisciplinary in situ simulation training on code response, teamwork, communication and comfort during intraoperative resuscitations. After simulation training, researchers noted improvements in technical skills of individuals and teams (e.g., CPR-related technical skills).
Liu SI, Shikar M, Gante E, et al. Crit Care Nurse. 2022;42:33-43.
Lack of communication between providers can contribute to failure to rescue. Following a series of deaths due in part to not identifying clinical deterioration in a timely manner and/or not escalating care, this surgical intensive care unit (SICU) implemented an interdisciplinary quality improvement intervention. The intervention consisted of educating nurses on conditions necessitating escalation, multidisciplinary rounds with night staff, and an escalation document in the electronic health record (EHR).