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Sajid IM, Parkunan A, Frost K. BMJ Open Qual. 2021;10:e001287.
Inappropriate use or overuse of clinical tests such as MRIs can be harmful to patients. This cohort study, including 107 general practitioners across 29 practices, found that only 4.9% of musculoskeletal MRIs were clearly indicated and only 16.7% of results appeared to be correctly interpreted by clinicians, suggesting the potential for significant misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis.

ACR Committee on MR Safety, Greenberg TD, Hoff MN, Gilk TB, et al. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2020;51(2):331-338. 

The reliable adoption of safe practices in clinical and research imaging will reduce risks to diagnostic radiology patients. This guideline builds on existing recommendations as a response to the changing needs of magnetic resonance practitioners and their patients. Strategies to ensure clinical teams stay updated on safety issues in this environment include reviewing and updating guidelines as well as requiring magnetic resonance directors to undergo annual patient safety training.
Goolsarran N, Martinez J, Garcia C. BMJ Open Qual. 2019;8:e000593.
Near misses can uncover process weaknesses and motivate improvement to prevent similar incidents. This commentary outlines how one hospital used Plan–Do–Study–Act cycles to improve their MRI screening process, including developing and implementing a safety checklist in the electronic medical record and building in a hard stop to prompt checking for contraindications.

Azar FM, ed. Orthop Clin North Am. 2018;49(4):A1-A8,389-552.

Quality and value have intersecting influence on the safety of health care. Articles in this special issue explore key principles of safe orthopedic care for both adult and pediatric patients. Topics covered include leadership's role in implementing sustainable improvement, postsurgery patient education as a safety tactic, and the impact of surgical volume on safe, high-quality care.
Blay E, Barnard C, Bilimoria KY. JAMA. 2018;319:495-496.
This commentary describes a case involving a patient with obstructive sleep apnea who received multiple sedating medications and subsequently had a cardiac arrest while undergoing MRI. The authors explore root causes and provide suggestions for improving the safety of care for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
Abujudeh H, Kaewlai R, Shaqdan K, et al. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2017;208.
This review summarizes key principles of high quality care and how they can be applied to augment radiology practice. Recommended safety improvement strategies included plan-do-study-act cycles, change management, and balanced scorecards.
Mansouri M, Aran S, Harvey HB, et al. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2016;43:998-1007.
This analysis of incident reports related to magnetic resonance imaging found that, similar to other settings, incident reports are infrequent, and most do not result in patient harm. Common reasons for reports were associated with test orders, adverse drug reactions, and safety of intravenous medication administration. Given known under-reporting in voluntary reporting systems, future work should incorporate other safety hazard detection methods.
Gilk T, Kanal E. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2015;42:566-71.
Although rare, adverse events still occur during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These incidents can be prevented through increased attention to the design of the environment in which scanners are used. This commentary describes the benefits to engaging frontline personnel in site planning to enhance MRI safety.