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James Augustine, MD, is the National Director of Prehospital Strategy at US Acute Care Solutions where he provides service as a Fire EMS Medical Director. We spoke with him about threats and concerns for patient safety for EMS when responding to a 911 call.

Patel J, Otto E, Taylor JS, et al. Dermatol Online J. 2021;27(3).

In an update to their 2010 article, this review’s authors summarized the patient safety literature in dermatology from 2009 to 2020. In addition to topics covered in the 2010 article, this article also includes diagnostic errors related to telemedicine, laser safety, scope of practice, and infections such as COVID-19. The authors recommend further studies, and reports are needed to reduce errors and improve patient safety.

Cumberlege J. London, England, Crown Copyright. July 8, 2020.

Implicit biases are known to affect the safety of health care. This analysis of the National Health Service (NHS) found weaknesses in NHS’ consideration of and response to women’s medication and medical device concerns. Among the recommendations submitted to improve patient centeredness and respect for patients are the establishment of central yet independent authority to serve as the conduit to address patient concerns and improve system safety accountability.
Ann D. Gaffey, RN, MSN, CPHRM, DFASHRM is the President of Healthcare Risk and Safety Strategies, LLC. Bruce Spurlock, MD is the President and CEO of Cynosure Health. We spoke with them about their role in the development of the Making Healthcare Safer III Report and what new information they think audiences will find particularly useful and interesting.

Teixeira PGR, Inaba K, Salim A, et al. Arch Surg. 2009;144(6):536-541.

Patient safety in trauma poses unique challenges given the acuity of the patients and the need for rapid assessment in delivering life-saving care. This study analyzed more than 2500 complications discussed at morbidity and mortality (M&M) conferences to characterize their preventability and clinical relevance. Investigators discovered that the complications ripe for quality improvement initiatives included unintended extubations, surgical technical failures, missed injuries, and intravascular catheter-related complications. An invited critique [see link below] reflects on the study's findings and points out the challenges in reporting performance data without needed standardization. A past AHRQ WebM&M commentary discussed the systematic assessment of trauma patients in the context of a missed patient injury.
A woman has an intrauterine contraceptive device placed at the time of "her period." A month later it is discovered that she is pregnant, as she had been at the time of the insertion.