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Kepner S, Adkins JA, Jones RM. Patient Safety. 2022;4:6-17.
Residents at long-term care facilities are at increased risk for healthcare-associated infections. Using 2021 data from the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PRS), this study characterized healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occurring at long-term care facilities. Researchers found that HAIs occurring at long-term care facilities decreased, but it is unknown whether this is reflective of fewer infections or poor reporting practices at long-term care facilities, or both.
Fleisher LA, Schreiber M, Cardo D, et al. N Engl J Med. 2022;386:609-611.
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted many aspects of health care. This commentary discusses its impact on patient safety. The authors discuss how the pandemic response dismantled strategies put in place to prevent healthcare-associated infections and falls, and stressors placed on both patients and healthcare workers directed attention away from ongoing safety improvement efforts. They argue that more resilience needs to be built into the system to ensure safety efforts are sustainable in challenging times.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In this annual publication, AHRQ reviews the results of the National Healthcare Quality Report and National Healthcare Disparities Report. The 2021 report highlights that a wide range of quality measures have shown improvement in quality, access, and cost.
J Patient Saf. 2020;16:s1-s56.
The patient safety evidence base has been growing exponentially for two decades with noted expansion into the non-acute care environment. This special issue highlights eight articles illustrating the range of practices examined in the AHRQ Making Healthcare Safer III report, including rapid response teams and failure to rescue, deprescribing practices and opioid stewardship.   
Smith SN, Greene MT, Mody L, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017;27.
Measuring safety culture is a core patient safety activity, but the relationship between safety culture and adverse events remains unclear. This prospective cohort study measured nursing home safety culture using the AHRQ Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture and also measured rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) as part of a quality improvement collaborative. Although safety culture survey results improved and CAUTIs declined over time, after accounting for other factors such as nursing home size and nonprofit versus for-profit status, there was no association between safety culture score and CAUTI rates. The authors recommend focusing on technical aspects of infection control such as standard protocols for catheter insertion rather than safety culture in order to improve patient safety outcomes. Correspondence published in the same issue points out limitations of a related study on the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.
Mody L, Greene T, Meddings J, et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2017;177:1154-1162.
Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are considered preventable never events. This pre–post implementation project conducted in long-term care facilities employed a multimodal intervention, similar to the Keystone ICU project. This sociotechnical approach included checklists, care team education, leadership engagement, communication interventions, and patient and family engagement. The project was conducted over a 2-year period across 48 states. In adjusted analyses, this effort led to a significant decrease in catheter-associated urinary tract infections, despite no change in catheter utilization, suggesting that needed use of catheters became safer. A related editorial declares this project "a triumph" for AHRQ's Safety Program for Long-term Care.