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Minyé HM, Benjamin EM. Br Dent J. 2022;232:879-885.
High reliability organization (HRO) principles used in other high-risk industries (such as aviation) can be applied patient safety. This article provides an overview of how HRO principles (preoccupation with failure, situational awareness, reluctance to simplify, deference to expertise, and commitment to resilience) can be successfully applied in dentistry.

This commentary presents two cases highlighting common medication errors in retail pharmacy settings and discusses the importance of mandatory counseling for new medications, use of standardized error reporting processes, and the role of clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in medical decision-making and ensuring medication safety.

Kulju S, Morrish W, King LA, et al. J Patient Saf. 2022;18:e290-e296.
Patient misidentification can lead to serious patient safety risks. Researchers used patient safety reports and root cause analyses (RCA) to characterize patient misidentification events in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The incidence of patient misidentification in inpatient and outpatient settings was similar and most commonly attributed to the absence of two unique patient identifiers. The authors identified three strategies to mitigate misidentification based on high-reliability principles: (1) develop policies for patient identification throughout the continuum of care, (2) develop policies to report and monitor patient misidentification measures, and (3) apply quality and process improvement tools to patient identification emphasizing use by front line staff.  
Adelman JS, Applebaum JR, Schechter CB, et al. JAMA. 2019;321:1780-1787.
Having multiple patient records open in the electronic health record increases the potential risk of wrong-patient actions. This randomized trial tested two different electronic health record configurations: one allowed up to four patient records to be open at a time, and the other allowed only one to be open. Among the 3356 clinicians with nearly 4.5 million order sessions, there were no significant differences in wrong-patient orders. However, the investigators noted that clinicians in the multiple records group placed most orders with just one record open. A post hoc analysis determined that the rate of errors increased when orders were placed with multiple records open. A related editorial highlights the tradeoffs between safety and efficiency and argues for examining the context of the two configurations, including throughput and clinician satisfaction. A previous PSNet perspective discussed assessing and improving the safety of electronic health records.
United States Government Accountability Office; GAO.
Record matching problems can have serious clinical impacts on patients. This report explores how to optimize demographic data integrity to improve patient record matching, as identifying information is increasingly integrated into shared record keeping systems. The investigation determined strategies to improve matching such as implementing standard data formats and disseminating best practices.
Ensaldo-Carrasco E, Carson-Stevens A, Cresswell K, et al. Br Dent J. 2018;224:733-740.
This Delphi study aimed to identify expert consensus on never events in dentistry. The resulting list of 23 events includes medication errors, retained objects, and wrong patient and wrong procedure events across diagnostic and treatment activities and is consistent with existing never events in medicine.
Presenting to his new primary physician's office for his first visit, a man was checked in under the record of an existing patient with the exact same name and age. The mistake wasn't noticed until the established patient received the new patient's test results by email.
Singh R, Hickner J, Mold J, et al. J Patient Saf. 2014;10:20-8.
Unreliable test result management systems and failure to follow-up on abnormal test results are common issues in ambulatory care. Using a modified failure mode and effect analysis methodology, this study sought to prospectively identify safety hazards in the laboratory testing process in primary care clinics.
Salinas M, López-Garrigós M, Lillo R, et al. Clin Biochem. 2013;46:1767-9.
Although electronic test ordering resulted in fewer patient identification errors in a clinical laboratory, significant variability in error rates between centers remained, emphasizing the continued effect of human behavior on interventions.
Galanter W, Falck S, Burns M, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2013;20:477-81.
Wrong-patient errors have long been a risk in hospitals. In one seminal case, a patient underwent an invasive procedure intended for another patient with a similar name. In the era of electronic medical records, errors such as entering notes or ordering medications for the wrong patient may occur as a consequence of multitasking. This AHRQ-funded study evaluated the effectiveness of an alert system, which required entry of an appropriate clinical diagnosis, at preventing wrong-patient medication errors in a computerized provider order entry system. Although the system did correctly identify and prevent incorrect prescriptions, 4000 alerts were required to prevent a single error. Other studies have successfully used forcing functions, or simply placing the patient's photograph on the order screen, to prevent wrong-patient errors.
An adolescent girl passed out after a soccer game, and her father, a physician, took her to the pediatrician for tests. The physician father obtained a copy of his daughter’s ECG, panicked because it was not normal, and began guiding his daughter’s medical care.
Söderberg J, Brulin C, Grankvist K, et al. Clin Chem Lab Med. 2009;47:195-201.
Most errors in laboratory medicine occur in the preanalytical phase, that is, before the sample reaches the laboratory. This survey found that phlebotomists frequently do not follow recommended procedures to minimize labeling and documentation errors.
Cohen MR.
This monthly selection of medication error reports describes a case of misidentifying home medications for a hospitalized patient, how character space limitations in medication administration records may cause medication errors, and fatal misuse of a fentanyl patch on a child. 
Cohen MR.
This monthly selection of medication error reports includes an error averted because the pharmacist checked the patient's prior prescription data and a dosing error due to consumer confusion about dose measurement.
Colvin G.
This video segment features an interview with two McKesson executives about how health information technology can help prevent medication errors.