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FDA Safety Communication. MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; December 7, 2020.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires patient preparation steps to protect against inadvertent harm. This announcement cautions patients and providers to assess masks being worn to protect against COVID-19 transmission for metal components that can result in patient burns during the exam. Recommendations for safety include enhanced screening to ensure masks are safe for the exam environment.

ACR Committee on MR Safety, Greenberg TD, Hoff MN, Gilk TB, et al. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2020;51(2):331-338. 

The reliable adoption of safe practices in clinical and research imaging will reduce risks to diagnostic radiology patients. This guideline builds on existing recommendations as a response to the changing needs of magnetic resonance practitioners and their patients. Strategies to ensure clinical teams stay updated on safety issues in this environment include reviewing and updating guidelines as well as requiring magnetic resonance directors to undergo annual patient safety training.
Goolsarran N, Martinez J, Garcia C. BMJ Open Qual. 2019;8:e000593.
Near misses can uncover process weaknesses and motivate improvement to prevent similar incidents. This commentary outlines how one hospital used Plan–Do–Study–Act cycles to improve their MRI screening process, including developing and implementing a safety checklist in the electronic medical record and building in a hard stop to prompt checking for contraindications.
After presenting with new left-sided weakness and hypertensive urgency, a woman was admitted to the stroke unit, and the consulting neurologist ordered an urgent MRI of the brain. Although the patient required pushes of intravenous hypertensive medication to control her blood pressure (BP), she was taken to radiology where the nurse checked her BP one more time before leaving her in the MRI machine with the BP cuff still on. Within a few seconds of starting the scan, the patient's arm with the BP cuff was sucked into the MRI scanner, making a loud noise.

Azar FM, ed. Orthop Clin North Am. 2018;49(4):A1-A8,389-552.

Quality and value have intersecting influence on the safety of health care. Articles in this special issue explore key principles of safe orthopedic care for both adult and pediatric patients. Topics covered include leadership's role in implementing sustainable improvement, postsurgery patient education as a safety tactic, and the impact of surgical volume on safe, high-quality care.
Gilk T, Latino RJ. Patient Saf Qual Healthc. November/December 2011;8:22-23,26-29.
Describing a case of accidental patient death in an MRI suite, this article reviews a root cause analysis of the event and notes that no regulatory efforts have been implemented to improve MRI safety in the 10 years following the incident.
Sentinel Event Alert. 2008;38:1-3.
This alert provides risk reduction strategies and recommendations to minimize opportunities for failures associated with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Note: This alert has been retired effective August 2016. Please refer to the information link below for further details.
International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
MRI Safety Week is held annually in July. This observance  supports the sharing of information and resources to support magnetic resonance imaging safety.
Rozovsky FA, Gilk TB, Latina RJ. Materials management in health care. 2006;15:18-23.
This article discusses risk management in magnetic resonance imaging facilities and the use of root cause analysis to inform risk management methodologies.
An infusion pump being used for routine sedation in a child undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan flew across the room and hit the MRI magnet, narrowly missing the child.