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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Soncrant C, Mills PD, Neily J, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16:41-46.
In this retrospective review of root cause analysis (RCA) reports of select gastrointestinal procedures, researchers identified 27 adverse events 30-month period. Nearly half (48%) of events caused major or catastrophic harm. The most frequently reported adverse events were attributable to human factors (22%), medication errors (22%) or retained items; retained items were associated with the most harm.
Neily J, Soncrant C, Mills PD, et al. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1:e185147.
The Joint Commission and National Quality Forum both consider wrong-site, wrong-procedure, and wrong-patient surgeries to be never events. Despite improvement approaches ranging from the Universal Protocol to nonpayment for the procedures themselves and any consequent care, these serious surgical errors continue to occur. This study measured the incidence of incorrect surgeries in Veterans Health Administration medical centers from 2010 to 2017. Surgical patient safety events resulting in harm were rare and declined by more than two-thirds from 2000 to 2017. Dentistry, ophthalmology, and neurosurgery had the highest incidence of in–operating room adverse events. Root cause analysis revealed that 29% of events could have been prevented with a correctly performed time-out. A WebM&M commentary examined an incident involving a wrong-side surgery.
Shoemaker SJ, Brach C, Edwards A, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2018;44:343-352.
The process of informed consent is designed to ensure that patients fully understand risks, benefits, and alternatives when receiving certain treatments. In this mixed-methods study, researchers examined the impact of two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality informed consent training modules across four hospitals.
St Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health; 2015.
This report provides background on the Minnesota Never Events reporting initiative, tips for patients on how to receive the safest care possible, and a table of events reported by all hospitals in the state.

J Health Serv Research Policy. 2010;15(suppl 1):S1-S91. 

This journal supplement contains numerous articles, reviews, and commentaries pertaining to patient safety–related activities and research in the United Kingdom.
Improvement AC of O and GCC on PS and Q. Obstet Gynecol. 2009;114:1424-7.
In this piece, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists emphasizes principles and objectives for patient safety in obstetrics and gynecology practices. The guidelines include encouraging a safety culture, reducing surgical errors, improving communication with patients and providers, and prioritizing safety.