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Farnborough, UK: Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch; April 22, 2021.

Wrong-site surgery in dentistry is a frequent and persistent never event. This report examines a case of pediatric wrong tooth extraction to reveal how the application of safety standards is influenced by the work environment and discusses the use of forcing functions to create barriers to error in practice.
Collins SJ, Newhouse R, Porter J, et al. AORN J. 2014;100:65-79.e5.
Organizations including The Joint Commission, the World Health Organization, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have focused on improving surgical safety. Using Reason's Swiss cheese model, this review analyzes the evidence for surgical checklist implementation to determine its usefulness in preventing wrong-site surgery and recommends tactics to address weaknesses.
Pikkel D, Sharabi-Nov A, Pikkel J. Risk Manag Healthc Policy. 2014;7:77-80.
In this study, cataract surgeons were asked to identify the correct eye for surgery when given the patient's name only, and again while looking at the patient's face. The surgeons answered incorrectly approximately a quarter of the time, arguing for the importance of preoperative time outs to avoid wrong-site surgery.
Neily J, Mills PD, Eldridge N, et al. Arch Surg. 2011;146:1235-9.
This analysis of incorrect surgical procedures in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system found an overall decline in the number of reported wrong-site, wrong-patient, and wrong-procedure errors compared with the authors' prior study. As in the earlier report, half of the incorrect procedures occurred outside of the operating room. Root cause analyses of errors revealed that lack of standardization and human factors issues were major contributing factors. During the time period of this study, the VA implemented a teamwork training program that has been associated with a significant decline in surgical mortality. The authors propose that additional, focused team training may be one solution to this persistent problem.
Duthie EA. J Patient Saf. 2010;6:108-114.
This study examines five wrong-procedure cases by applying James Reason’s human error theory, and describes the role of human behavior and cognitive processes in the events. The authors conclude that a systems approach is a more effective prevention strategy than relying on education, counseling, and disciplinary action.

Blum A. Bloomberg. August 14, 2006.

This article discusses how hospital design, including standardized operating rooms, better ventilation systems, and green design can improve patient safety and decrease costs.
Trusting an incorrectly labeled chest x-ray over physical exam findings, a resident places a chest tube for pneumothorax in the wrong side.
Trusting his memory more than the chart, a surgeon directs a resident to remove the wrong side on a patient with unilateral vulvar cancer.