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MedWatch Safety Alert. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration; August 20, 2021.
This announcement seeks to raise awareness of the potential risks associated with the use of robotic-assisted surgical devices in mastectomies or cancer-related care. Recommendations for patients who may seek to have robotically assisted surgery include asking about their surgeon's experience with these procedures and discussing benefits, risks, and alternatives regarding available treatment options with their health care provider. Suggestions for health care providers include completing specialized training on procedures they perform. A WebM&M commentary described the challenges and benefits associated with robotic surgery.

Farnborough, UK: Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch; June 3, 2021.

Wrong site/wrong patent surgery is a persistent healthcare never event. This report examines National Health Service (NHS) reporting data to identify how ambulatory patient identification errors contribute to wrong patient care. The authors recommend that the NHS use human factors methods to design control processes to target and manage the risks in the outpatient environment such as lack of technology integration, shared waiting area space, and reliance on verbal communication at clinic.
Price CS, Savitz LA. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; March 2012. AHRQ Publication No. 12-0046-EF.
This report explores techniques to detect and monitor surgical site infections (SSIs), evaluates a computer-assisted algorithm to identify patients at risk for SSIs, and makes recommendations to investigate surgery-specific risk factors.
Sixth Report of Session 2008–09. House of Commons Health Committee. London, England: The Stationery Office; July 3, 2009. Publication HC 151-I.
This government report analyzes the National Health Service's efforts to enhance patient safety and recommends improving certain areas, such as adopting technology, analyzing failure, and ensuring both practitioner education and adequate staffing.
American College of Surgeons.
During the 1980s, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) received significant public scrutiny over the quality of surgical care in their hospitals. This motivated Congress to mandate reporting of surgical outcomes annually and led to the important National VA Surgical Risk Study (NVASRS) across 44 VA medical centers. In 1994, the success of the NVASRS study helped foster the development of a program for monitoring and improving the quality of surgical care across all VA medical centers, called the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). As the program and its success grew, the private sector adopted the NSQIP, and subsequent studies have demonstrated similar benefits outside the VA system. The American College of Surgeons now operates and administers a parallel NSQIP program for the private sector.