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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 1614 Results
WebM&M Case November 29, 2023

This case describes a 55-year-old woman who sustained critical injuries after a motor vehicle crash and had a lengthy hospitalization. On hospital day 30, a surgeon placed a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube in the intensive care unit (ICU) after computed tomography (CT) scan showed no interposed bowel between the stomach and the anterior abdominal wall.  After the uncomplicated PEG placement, the surgeon cleared the patient’s team to advance tube feeds as tolerated.

Cam H, Wennlöf B, Gillespie U, et al. BMC Health Serv Res. 2023;23:1211.
When patients are discharged from the hospital, they (and their informal caregivers) are given copious amounts of information that must also be communicated to their primary care provider. This qualitative study of primary care and hospital physicians, nurses, and pharmacists highlights several barriers to complete and effective communication between levels of care, particularly regarding geriatric medication safety. Barriers include the large number of complex patients and incongruent expectations of responsibility of primary and hospital providers. Support systems, such as electronic health records, can both enable and hinder communication.
Weaver MD, Barger LK, Sullivan JP, et al. Sleep Health. 2023;Epub Nov 6.
Current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour regulations limit resident work hours (no more than 80 hours per week or 24-28 consecutive hours on duty) in an effort to improve both resident and patient safety. This nationally representative survey found that over 90% of US adults disagree with the current duty hour policies, with 66% of respondents supporting additional limits on duty hours (to no more than 40 hours per week or 12 consecutive hours).

Washington DC; VA Office of the Inspector General; October 31, 2023; Report no. 22-03599-07.

Disclosure failures detract from learning, appropriate incident examination, and safe care delivery. This report examined factors contributing to poor disclosure practices associated with the care of three patients. Lack of report submission, uninitiated root cause analysis, and inadequate documentation were process weaknesses highlighted by the review. 
Olazo K, Gallagher TH, Sarkar U. J Patient Saf. 2023;19:547-552.
Marginalized patients are more likely to experience adverse events and it is important to encourage effective disclosure to reinforce and reestablish trust between patients and providers. This qualitative study involving clinicians and patient safety professionals explored challenges responding to and disclosing errors involving historically marginalized patients. Participants identified multilevel challenges, including fragmentation of care and patient mistrust as well a desire for disclosure training and culturally appropriate disclosure toolkits to support effective error disclosure.
Arbaje AI, Greyson S, Keita Fakeye M, et al. J Patient Saf Risk Manag. 2023;28:201-207.
Older adult patients and family caregivers face numerous safety challenges when transitioning from the hospital to skilled home health (HH). This article describes how older adults and their family caregivers, HH frontline providers, HH leadership, and HH hospital-based transition coordinators, were engaged to identify best practices to implement the Hospital-to-Home Health Transition Quality (H3TQ) Index. This participatory co-design process identified ways patients, caregivers, and staff differ in how and when to administer the H3TQ Index, confirming the importance of engaging a wide range of stakeholders in design processes.
Liu Y, Jun H, Becker A, et al. J Prev Alz Dis. 2023;Epub Oct 24.
Persons with dementia are at increased risk for adverse events compared to those without dementia, highlighting the importance of a timely diagnosis. In this study, researchers estimate approximately 20% of primary care patients aged 65 and older are expected to have a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia; however, only 8% have received such a diagnosis. Missed diagnosis prevents patients from receiving appropriate care, including newly FDA-approved medications to slow cognitive decline.
Lim PJH, Chen L, Siow S, et al. Int J Qual Health Care. 2023;35:mzad086.
Surgical safety checklists (SCC) are utilized around the world, but checklist completion at the operating room level remains inconsistent. This review summarizes facilitators and barriers to completion. Resistance or endorsement at the individual surgeon level remains a significant factor in SSC completion. Early inclusion of frontline staff in evaluation and implementation supported increased use.
Gallois JB, Zagory JA, Barkemeyer B, et al. Pediatr Qual Saf. 2023;8:e695.
Structured handoff tools can improve situational awareness and patient safety. This study describes the development and implementation of a bespoke tool for handoffs from the operating room to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). While use remained inconsistent during the study period, the goal of 80% compliance was achieved and 83% surveyed staff agreed or strongly agreed that the handoff provided needed information, up from 21% before implementation.

Rickert J, Järvinen TLN, Lee MJ, et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013-2023.

This quarterly commentary explores a wide range of subjects associated with patient safety, such as the impact of disruptive behavior on teams, the value of apologies, and safety challenges inherent in clinician strike actions. Older materials are available online for free.
Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality.
The comprehensive unit-based safety program (CUSP) approach emphasizes improving safety culture through a continuous process of reporting and learning from errors, improving teamwork, and engaging staff at all levels in safety efforts. Available on demand and live, this session covers how to utilize CUSP, including understanding and addressing challenges to implementation. The next virtual session will be held January 16, 2024.
Dorimain M-V, Plouffe-Malette M, Paquette M, et al. BMJ Open Qual. 2023;12:e002291.
Laboratory tests are an integral part of diagnosing illness and injury, but system issues can result in the delayed communication of results to patients. This article describes use of the AHRQ toolkit Improving Your Office Testing Process to implement new testing and communication procedures. As an academic family practice clinic, an important first step was allowing residents to order tests and receive results in their own name instead of through an attending physician, which can cause delays in communication to patients. Providers and patients were satisfied with the new process.

Washington, DC: The Veterans Affairs Inspector General. October 4, 2023. Report No. 23-00080-227.

Wrong-site surgery and unintentionally retained surgical items are considered never events. This report details five wrong-site surgeries and three instances of retained surgical items at one VA medical center between 2018 and 2022. The findings suggest that timely investigation into events from 2018-2021 may have prevented three incidents in 2022. Additionally, the medical center failed to fully report the provider responsible for three of the wrong-site surgeries.
Ramjaun A, Hammond Mobilio M, Wright N, et al. Ann Surg. 2023;278:e1142-e1147.
Situational awareness is an essential component of teamwork. This qualitative study examined how situational awareness and team culture impact intraoperative handoff practice. Researchers found that participants often assumed that team members are interchangeable and that trained staff should be able to determine handoff appropriateness without having to consult the larger operating room team – both of these assumptions hinder team communication and situational awareness.
van Moll C, Egberts TCG, Wagner C, et al. J Patient Saf. 2023;19:573-579.
Diagnostic testing errors can contribute to delays in diagnosis and to serious patient harm. Researchers analyzed 327 voluntary incident reports from one medical center in the Netherlands and found that diagnostic testing errors most commonly occurred during the pre-analytic phase (77%), and were predominantly caused by human factors (59%). The researchers found that these diagnostic testing errors contributed to a potential diagnostic error in 60% of cases.
Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. January 30 and February 1, 2024.
Team training programs seek to improve communication and coordination among team members to reduce the potential for medical error. This virtual workshop will train participants to design, implement, and evaluate team training programs in their organizations based on the TeamSTEPPS model. 
Yung AHW, Pak CS, Watson B. Int J Qual Health Care. 2023;35:mzad065.
Cognitive aids such as mnemonics can help improve process reliability and promote patient safety. Based on an initial scoping review, this article describes a proposed taxonomy for clinical handoff mnemonics and their clinical processes and functions, which could help clinical teams design handoff mnemonics that best fit their workplace.
Kapoor A, Patel P, Mbusa D, et al. J Gen Intern Med. 2023;Epub Sep 27.
Pharmacists are frequently involved in medication reviews for hospitalized patients prescribed direct oral anti-coagulants (DOAC). This randomized controlled study explored pharmacist involvement with patients prescribed DOAC in ambulatory care. The intervention included up to three phone calls, electronic health record communication with the prescriber, and recommendations for lab work. After 90 days, there were no differences in clinically important medication errors between groups.