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The PSNet Collection: All Content

The AHRQ PSNet Collection comprises an extensive selection of resources relevant to the patient safety community. These resources come in a variety of formats, including literature, research, tools, and Web sites. Resources are identified using the National Library of Medicine’s Medline database, various news and content aggregators, and the expertise of the AHRQ PSNet editorial and technical teams.

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Displaying 1 - 16 of 16 Results
Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Harrisburg, PA: Patient Safety Authority; April 2022.
This report summarizes patient safety improvement work in the state of Pennsylvania and reviews the 2021 activities of the Patient Safety Authority, including the Agency's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, video programs, liaison efforts, publication programs, and the launch of a new learning management system.
Curated Libraries
September 13, 2021
Ensuring maternal safety is a patient safety priority. This library reflects a curated selection of PSNet content focused on improving maternal safety. Included resources explore strategies with the potential to improve maternal care delivery and outcomes, such as high reliability, care standardization,teamwork, unit-based safety initiatives, and...
Giardina TD, Royse KE, Khanna A, et al. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2020;46:282-290.
This study analyzed self-reported adverse events captured on a national online questionnaire to determine the association between patient-reported contributory factors and patient-reported physical, emotional or financial harm. Contributory factors identified in the analysis focused on issues with health care personnel communication, fatigue, or response (e.g., doctor was slow to arrive, nurse was slow to respond to call button). These patient-reported contributory factors increased the likelihood of reporting any type of harm.
Perea-Pérez B, Labajo-González E, Acosta-Gío AE, et al. J Patient Saf. 2020;16.
Based on malpractice claims data in Spain, the authors propose eleven recommendations to mitigate preventable adverse events in dentistry. These recommendations include developing a culture of safety, improving the quality of clinical records, safe prescribing practices, using checklists in oral surgical procedures, and having an action plan for life-threatening emergencies in the dental clinic.
Gubar S.
This newspaper article describes how surgical complications, health care–associated infections, and ineffective patient–provider communication contributed to a patient's experience with harm and suggests that transparency around the incident and preoperative patient briefings could have improved the situation.
Minnesota Hospital Association; MHA.
This Web site provides access to materials for patient safety improvement efforts in Minnesota, including initiatives to reduce adverse drug events and hospital collaboratives to implement best practices.

Rogers WA, ed. J Exp Psychol Appl. 2011;17(3):191-302.

Articles in this special issue explore the impact of cognition on health care activities such as patient identification, interruptions, and team communication.
Schaefer MK, Jhung M, Dahl M, et al. JAMA. 2010;303:2273-9.
This study discovered that nearly 70% of ambulatory surgical centers had at least one lapse in infection control. The most common lapses involved using a single-dose medication vial for more than one patient and failure to adhere to recommended practices for equipment handling.
Austin, TX: Texas Medical Institute for Technology and the Quaid Foundation; 2010.
This documentary reports on families affected by medical errors; it includes the story of a high-profile heparin overdose and how it transformed the family of actor Dennis Quaid into advocates for patient safety.

Rein L. Washington Post. July 21, 2009:E1.

This news article reports on Washington, DC–area initiatives to track preventable patient injury and discusses strategies to hold hospitals accountable to reduce the number of avoidable incidents.
Pear R. New York Times. August 19, 2007.
This article reports on a new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rule mandating that Medicare will no longer pay for treating certain preventable errors starting in 2008, including some hospital-acquired infections, decubitus ulcers, and retained foreign bodies. The policy is generating considerable discussion in patient safety circles, with some expressing concerns regarding the economic impact on hospitals and the increased efforts it is likely to create for hospitals to document certain patient problems present at the time of admission.