Skip to main content

WebM&M: Case Studies

WebM&M (Morbidity & Mortality Rounds on the Web) features expert analysis of medical errors reported anonymously by our readers. Spotlight Cases include interactive learning modules available for CME. Commentaries are written by patient safety experts and published monthly.

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

This Month's WebM&Ms

Update Date: December 14, 2022
Narath Carlile, MD, MPH, Clyde Lanford Smith, MD, MPH, DTM&H, James H. Maguire, MD, and Gordon D. Schiff, MD | December 14, 2022

This case describes a man in his 70s with a history of multiple myeloma and multiple healthcare encounters for diarrhea in the previous five years, which had always been attributed to viral or unknown causes, without any microbiologic or serologic... Read More

Take the Quiz
Naileshni S. Singh, MD | December 14, 2022

A 63-year-old woman was admitted to a hospital for anterior cervical discectomy (levels C4-C7) and plating for cervical spinal stenosis under general anesthesia. The operation was uneventful and intraoperative neuromonitoring was used to help prevent... Read More

Mark Fedyk, PhD, Nathan Fairman, MD, MPH, Patrick S. Romano, MD, MPH, John MacMillan, MD, and Monica Miller, RN, MS, CCRN | December 14, 2022

A 65-year-old man with metastatic liver disease presented to the hospital with worsening abdominal pain after a partial hepatectomy and development of a large ventral hernia. Imaging studies revealed perforated diverticulitis. A goals-of-care... Read More

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues?
Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

All WebM&M: Case Studies (12)

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 WebM&M Case Studies
Caprice C. Greenberg, MD, MPH| October 1, 2010
Following an appendectomy, an elderly man continued to have right lower quadrant pain. Reviewing the specimen removed during the surgery, the pathologist found no appendiceal tissue. The patient was emergently taken back to the OR, and the appendix was located and removed.
Christopher Fee, MD| March 21, 2009
Interrupted during a telephone handoff, an ED physician, despite limited information, must treat a patient in respiratory arrest. The patient is stabilized and transferred to the ICU with a presumed diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia and septic shock. Later, ICU physicians obtain further history that leads to the correct diagnosis: pulmonary embolism.
Bruce D. Adams, MD| October 1, 2007
A code blue is called on an elderly man with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, and schizophrenia hospitalized on the inpatient psychiatry service. Housestaff covering the code team did not know where the service was located, and when the team arrived, they found their equipment to be incompatible with the leads on the patient.
Todd Sagin, MD, JD| March 1, 2006
Despite formal investigation of complications in past cases, a senior surgeon is still allowed to operate on a patient, with disastrous results.
Allan Krumholz, MD| December 1, 2004
At a new patient visit, a man with seizure disorder requests a 'handicapped' license plate due to difficulty walking long distances. To his surprise, the physician explains that he needs to report his seizures to the DMV.
Daniel Mason, MD| September 1, 2004
A medical student discovers that a hospital's radiology records are accessible via Internet, without any security, and struggles with whether and to whom to report the obvious HIPAA violation.
Darrell Campbell, Jr., MD| June 1, 2004
Despite persuasion from a surgical resident that her mother's life was in danger, a patient's daughter refuses consent for surgery on her mother. This was wise, since the procedure was intended for a different patient with the same unusual surname.
Stephen G. Pauker, MD; Susan P. Pauker, MD| May 1, 2004
Owing to privacy concerns, a nurse draws the drapes on a 3-year-old child in recovery following surgery, and unfortunately does not realize the child is in distress until loud inspiratory stridor is heard.
Bryan A. Liang, MD, PhD, JD| May 1, 2004
Understanding that she may lose her life without it, a woman severely injured in a collision rejects a blood transfusion for religious reasons. However, her parents persuade the physicians otherwise, and the woman lives.
Colin F. Mackenzie, MD| March 1, 2004
Video monitors near the operating room reveal a patient's identity, and gossip spreads about a very private issue.
Marilyn Sue Bogner, PhD| July 1, 2003
Following hysterectomy, a PCA pump is mistakenly continued in a woman suffering an adverse reaction to morphine, noticed only when her respiratory status set off an alarm.
Sidney T. Bogardus, Jr., MD| April 1, 2003
Delirious and coagulopathic patient with subdural hematomas falls out of bed—twice!