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WebM&M: Case Studies

WebM&M (Morbidity & Mortality Rounds on the Web) features expert analysis of medical errors reported anonymously by our readers. Spotlight Cases include interactive learning modules available for CME. Commentaries are written by patient safety experts and published monthly.

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

This Month's WebM&Ms

Update Date: August 5, 2022
Samson Lee, PharmD, and Mithu Molla, MD, MBA | August 5, 2022

This WebM&M highlights two cases where home diabetes medications were not reviewed during medication reconciliation and the preventable harm that could have occurred. The commentary discusses the importance of medication reconciliation, how to... Read More

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues?
Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

All WebM&M: Case Studies (18)

1 - 18 of 18 WebM&M Case Studies
Nancy Staggers, PhD, RN| October 1, 2017
Hospitalized with sepsis secondary to an infected IV line through which she was receiving treprostnil (a high-alert medication used to treat pulmonary hypertension), a woman was transferred to interventional radiology for placement of a new permanent catheter once the infection cleared. Sign-off between departments included a warning not to flush the line since it would lead to a dangerous overdose. However, while attempting to identify an infusion pump alarm, a radiology technician accidentally flushed the line, which led to a near code situation.
Vinod K. Bhutani, MD, and Ronald J. Wong| October 1, 2017
A newborn with elevated total serum bilirubin (TSB) due to hemolytic disease was placed on a mattress with embedded phototherapy lights for treatment, but the TSB continued to climb. The patient was transferred to the neonatal ICU for an exchange transfusion. The neonatologist requested testing of the phototherapy lights, and their irradiance level was found to be well below the recommended level. The lights were replaced, the patient's TSB level began to drop, and the exchange transfusion was aborted.
Robert J. Weber, PharmD, MS| February 1, 2010
An elderly woman presented to the emergency department following a hip fracture. Although the patient's medication bottles were used to generate a medication list, one of the dosages was transcribed incorrectly. Because the patient then received four times her regular dose, her surgery was delayed due to cardiac side effects.
Hedy Cohen, RN, BSN, MS| March 21, 2009
New medication administration policies at one hospital cause a patient to receive two doses of her daily medication within a few hours, when only one dose was intended.
F. Daniel Duffy, MD; Christine K. Cassel, MD| October 1, 2007
Following surgery, a woman on a patient-controlled analgesia pump is found to be lethargic and incoherent, with a low respiratory rate. The nurse contacted the attending physician, who dismisses the patient's symptoms and chastises the nurse for the late call.
Saul N. Weingart, MD, PhD| August 1, 2006
In the office, a man with diabetes has high blood sugar, and the nurse practitioner orders insulin. After administration, she discovers that she has injected the insulin with a tuberculin syringe rather than an insulin syringe, resulting in a 10-fold overdose.
Jeffrey Driver, JD, MBA | October 1, 2004
Following a swallowing study, a speech pathologist recommends that a patient receive nothing by mouth, due to a high risk of aspiration. However, because the report is misfiled, no NPO order is implemented.
Robert L. Wears, MD, MS| September 1, 2004
A nurse notices that an IV medication she is about to administer is possibly mislabeled, as it looks like a different drug. However, she is interrupted before she can call the pharmacy and winds up hanging the bag anyway.
Albert W. Wu, MD, MPH; Peter J. Pronovost, MD, PhD| January 1, 2004
A patient receiving end-of-life care, whose code status was DNR, encounters a potentially life-threatening medication error.
Eric J. Thomas, MD, MPH; Frederick A. Moore, MD| November 1, 2003
A scrub nurse cannot find a missing suction catheter tip, but the surgeon closes the patient. A post-operative x-ray reveals the tip in the patient's chest.
Bryony Dean Franklin, PhD| November 1, 2003
An infant born with sluggish breathing is given Lanoxin instead of naloxone, and dies of digoxin toxicity.
Charles Vincent, PhD| October 1, 2003
Trusting his memory more than the chart, a surgeon directs a resident to remove the wrong side on a patient with unilateral vulvar cancer.
Mary Caldwell, RN, PhD, MBA; Kathleen A. Dracup, RN, DNSc| September 1, 2003
A patient given diltiazem rather than saline suffers severe bradycardia requiring temporary pacemaker.
Marilynn M. Rosenthal, PhD| July 1, 2003
An anxious patient awaiting ambulatory surgery is mistakenly put on the wrong operating table.
Marilyn Sue Bogner, PhD| July 1, 2003
Following hysterectomy, a PCA pump is mistakenly continued in a woman suffering an adverse reaction to morphine, noticed only when her respiratory status set off an alarm.
Michael Cohen, RPh, MS, ScD (hon)| April 1, 2003
Antipsychotic, rather than antihistamine, mistakenly dispensed to woman with bipolar disorder with new urticaria.