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WebM&M: Case Studies

WebM&M (Morbidity & Mortality Rounds on the Web) features expert analysis of medical errors reported anonymously by our readers. Spotlight Cases include interactive learning modules available for CME. Commentaries are written by patient safety experts and published monthly.

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

This Month's WebM&Ms

Update Date: August 5, 2022
Samson Lee, PharmD, and Mithu Molla, MD, MBA | August 5, 2022

This WebM&M highlights two cases where home diabetes medications were not reviewed during medication reconciliation and the preventable harm that could have occurred. The commentary discusses the importance of medication reconciliation, how to... Read More

Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues?
Have you encountered medical errors or patient safety issues? Submit your case below to help the medical community and to prevent similar errors in the future.

All WebM&M: Case Studies (9)

1 - 9 of 9 WebM&M Case Studies
Michael J. Barrington, MBBS, PhD, and Yoshiaki Uda, MBBS| April 1, 2017
An older woman admitted to the medical-surgical ward with multiple right-sided rib fractures received a paravertebral block to control the pain. After the procedure, the anesthesiologist realized that the block had been placed on the wrong side. The patient required an additional paravertebral block on the correct side, which increased her risk of complications and exposed her to additional medication.
Kerm Henriksen, PhD; Kendall K. Hall, MD, MS| June 1, 2011
Admitted to the hospital with community-acquired pneumonia, an elderly man nearly receives dangerous potassium supplementation due to a “critical panic value” call for a low potassium in another patient.
Dorothy Dougherty, RN| November 1, 2010
A hospitalized 2-month-old infant is fed breast milk from another infant's mother after the wrong bottle is pulled from the ward's refrigerator.
Michael Astion, MD, PhD | December 1, 2006
A man admitted to the hospital for elective surgery has blood drawn. Despite a policy for proper identification, the blood samples were all mislabeled with another patient's name. The error was discovered at the lab, and there was no harm to the patient.
Dennis S. O'Leary, MD; William E. Jacott, MD| December 1, 2004
Despite a "time out" and having his leg marked by the surgeon, a patient comes perilously close to having surgery on the wrong leg.
Peter Lindenauer, MD, MSc| October 1, 2004
A surgical patient and a neurosurgical patient are scheduled to be moved to different beds, the second taking the first's spot. However, the move is documented electronically before it occurs physically, and a medication error nearly ensues.
Harold S. Kaplan, MD| February 1, 2004
Blood typing tubes for a married couple brought to an ED after a trauma are labeled with the opposite stickers. By coincidence, the wife's blood type was already on file. An alert blood-bank technologist catches the mistake.
Albert W. Wu, MD, MPH; Peter J. Pronovost, MD, PhD| January 1, 2004
A patient receiving end-of-life care, whose code status was DNR, encounters a potentially life-threatening medication error.
Marilynn M. Rosenthal, PhD| July 1, 2003
An anxious patient awaiting ambulatory surgery is mistakenly put on the wrong operating table.