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Continuing Education

What is PSNet Continuing Education?

PSNet Continuing Education offerings include WebM&M Spotlight Cases and Commentaries, which are certified for Continuing Medical Education/ Continuing Education Units (CME/CEU) and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credit through the University of California, Davis (UCD) Health Office of Continuing Medical Education. 
 

Each WebM&M Spotlight Case and Commentary is certified for the AMA PRA Category 1™ and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) through the American Board of Internal Medicine by the Office of Continuing Medical Education (OCME) at UCD, Health. 
 

Learn more about how to earn credit from UCD 

UCD's CME Security and Privacy 

 


How does it work?

Earn CME or MOC credit and trainee certification by successfully completing quizzes based on Cases & Commentaries. 

  • Individuals have two attempts at each quiz to achieve a passing score of 80% or higher in order to earn credit.
  • If you fail a quiz twice, the quiz will become unavailable, but the Spotlight case will be available as read-only.
  • Spotlight Cases older than three years continue to be available as read-only, but their associated quizzes have been disabled.
  • If you have questions specifically regarding University of California San Francisco (UCSF) CME/CEU, including registration, accreditation, or content, please email us at info@ocme.ucsf.edu.

New WebM&M Spotlight Cases

Jazmin A. Wander, MD and David K. Barnes, MD, FACEP. | January 31, 2024

A woman presented to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of a laceration to the palmer aspect of her left thumb. The treating clinician... Read More

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All WebM&M Spotlight Cases (192)

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Gain access to quizzes and start earning CME, CEU, or Trainee certification.
Displaying 1 - 10 of 192 WebM&M Spotlight Cases
Jazmin A. Wander, MD and David K. Barnes, MD, FACEP.| January 31, 2024

A woman presented to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of a laceration to the palmer aspect of her left thumb. The treating clinician documented a superficial 3cm laceration and that the patient was unable to flex her thumb due to pain. The clinician closed the laceration with sutures. Neither a sensory examination nor wound exploration was documented. No fracture or foreign body was identified on x-ray but the procedure note did not mention whether the tendon was visualized. Several weeks after discharge from the ED, the patient was still unable to flex her thumb and was referred to an orthopedic surgeon and a hand specialist who surgically repaired a laceration to the flexor tendon. The commentary discusses the importance of including neurovascular and functional testing when evaluating hand injuries and the role of diagnostic imaging as well as strategies to improve diagnosis and mitigate human error when treating hand injuries.

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Rachel Ann Hight, MD, FACS | November 29, 2023

This case describes a 55-year-old woman who sustained critical injuries after a motor vehicle crash and had a lengthy hospitalization. On hospital day 30, a surgeon placed a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube in the intensive care unit (ICU) after computed tomography (CT) scan showed no interposed bowel between the stomach and the anterior abdominal wall.  After the uncomplicated PEG placement, the surgeon cleared the patient’s team to advance tube feeds as tolerated. After several weeks of poorly tolerated tube feedings, the interventional radiology team reviewed a CT scan which had been obtained by another service 6 days after the PEG was placed and noted (for the first time) that the gastrostomy tube traversed the liver. Insufficient communication and fragmented care coordination across care settings contributed to poor management of the malpositioned PEG tube. The commentary underscores the importance of clear documentation of complications, highlights best practices to mitigate risks during patient care transition, and the importance of using multiple communication approaches to ensure appropriate continuity of care.

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Leah Timbag, MD, MPH, Voltaire R. Sinigayan, MD, and Mithu Molla, MD, MBA | September 27, 2023

This case describes the failure to identify a brewing abdominal process, which over the span of hours led to fulminant sepsis with rapid clinical deterioration and eventual demise. The patient’s ascitic fluid cultures and autopsy findings confirmed bowel perforation, but this diagnosis was never explicitly considered. The commentary discusses the importance of early identification of sepsis, the role of biomarkers and risk scores in conjunction with bedside examinations to assess patients with suspected sepsis, and approaches to improve the prognosis of patients in septic shock, such as protocolized sepsis bundles.

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Sarah Marshall, MD and Nina M. Boe, MD| August 30, 2023

A 31-year-old pregnant patient with type 1 diabetes on an insulin pump was hospitalized for euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). She was treated for dehydration and vomiting, but not aggressively enough, and her metabolic acidosis worsened over several days. The primary team hesitated to prescribe medications safe in pregnancy and delayed reaching out to the Maternal Fetal Medicine (MFM) consultant, who made recommendations but did not ensure that the primary team received and understood the information. The commentary highlights how breakdowns in communication amongst providers can lead to medical errors and prolonged hospitalization and how the principles of team-based care, communication, and a culture of safety can improve care in complex health care situations.

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Theresa Duong, MD, Noelle Boctor, MD, and James Bourgeois, OD, MD| July 31, 2023

This case describes a 65-year-old man with alcohol use disorder who presented to a hospital 36 hours after his last alcoholic drink and was found to be in severe alcohol withdrawal. The patient’s Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment (CIWA) score was very high, indicating signs and symptoms of severe alcohol withdrawal. He was treated with symptom-triggered dosing of benzodiazepines utilizing the CIWA protocol and dexmedetomidine continuous infusion. The treating team had planned to wean the infusion; however, the following day, the patient was noted to be obtunded on a high dose of dexmedetomidine. He remained somnolent for two additional days and subsequently developed aspiration pneumonia and Clostridioides difficile colitis, which further prolonged his hospital stay and strained relationships among the patient's family, the nursing staff and medical team. The commentary reviews the medications commonly used to treat alcohol withdrawal and the risks associated with these medications, the use of standardized medication order sets for continuous weight-based infusions within the intensive care unit, and ways to minimize clinician bias in assessing and treating substance use disorders.

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Elizabeth Gould, NP-C, CORLN, Kathleen M Carlsen, PA, Brooks T Kuhn, MD, MAS, and Jonathan Trask, RN| June 28, 2023

A 56-year-old man was admitted to the hospital and required mechanical ventilation due to COVID-19-related pneumonia and acute respiratory failure. The care team performed a tracheostomy percutaneously at the bedside with some difficulty. The tracheostomy tube was secured, inspected via bronchoscopy, and properly sutured. During the next few days, the respiratory therapist noticed a leak that required additional inflation of the cuff to maintain an adequate seal. Before the care team could change the tracheostomy, the tracheal cuff burst, and the patient developed hypotension and required 100% inhaled oxygen via the ventilator. The commentary summarizes best practices regarding proper tracheostomy tube choice and sizing to prevent leaks around cuffs, the importance of staff education on airway cuff pressure monitoring, and the role of multidisciplinary tracheostomy teams to optimize tracheostomy care.

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A 25-year-old obese patient required an emergency cesarean delivery. As the obstetric team was in a hurry to deliver the baby, the team huddle was rushed. After the delivery, the anesthesia care provider discovered that the patient had received subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg four hours preoperatively, which was not mentioned by the obstetric team during the previous huddle. The patient developed a dense, persistent motor and sensory block of the lower limbs at 6 to 8 hours after delivery, which gradually wore off and the patient recovered without any permanent sensory or motor impairment. The commentary highlights the importance of preoperative huddles and pre-incision time out checklists to improve patient outcomes as well as the role of emergency cesarean simulation training for obstetric, anesthesia and nursing care teams.

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Commentary by Michael Leonardo Amashta, MD, and David K. Barnes, MD, FACEP | April 26, 2023

This case involves a procedural sedation error in a 3-year-old patient who presented to the Emergency Department with a left posterior hip dislocation. The commentary summarizes the indications and risks of procedural sedation in non-surgical settings and highlights the value of implementing system-wide safety protocols and practices to prevent medication administration errors during high-risk procedures.

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An adult woman with a history of suicidal ideation was taking prescribed antidepressants, but later required admission to the hospital after overdosing on her prescribed medications. A consulting psychiatrist evaluated the patient but recommended sending her home on a benzodiazepine alone, under observation by her mother. The commentary discusses challenges in assessing suicide risk and establishing the underlying diagnosis after a suicide attempt, the importance of managing relationships between psychiatric consultants and other physicians, and the role of appropriate pharmacotherapy and follow-up after the patient has medically recovered from a suicide attempt.

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