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What US hospitals are currently doing to prevent common device-associated infections: results from a national survey.

Saint S, Greene MT, Fowler KE, et al. What US hospitals are currently doing to prevent common device-associated infections: results from a national survey. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28(9):741-749. doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009111.

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May 8, 2019
Saint S, Greene MT, Fowler KE, et al. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28:741-749.

This study focused on three types of device-associated infections: catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Investigators surveyed hospital infection control leaders at 528 hospitals about prevention practices for each of these infections. More than 90% of respondents had established surveillance for CAUTI rates throughout their facilities, nearly 100% used two key CLABSI prevention techniques as part of their insertion protocol, and 98% used semirecumbent positioning to prevent VAP. Gaps remain in use of antimicrobial devices across all three of these infection types. The authors conclude that, although implementation of evidence-based infection practices are improving over time, some gaps in device-associated infection prevention persist. A past PSNet perspective discussed the history around efforts to address preventable hospital-acquired infections.

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Saint S, Greene MT, Fowler KE, et al. What US hospitals are currently doing to prevent common device-associated infections: results from a national survey. BMJ Qual Saf. 2019;28(9):741-749. doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2018-009111.